Home Health Aide’s Role in Care & Support for Parkinson’s Disease Patients

There is currently no cure for Parkinson’s disease. However, there are ways to manage symptoms, improve quality of life and maintain independence. The objective of treatment is to help make life more comfortable and enjoyable for individuals, control symptoms and slow the progression of the disease.

There are a number of medications prescribed by doctors to help individuals manage problems associated with Parkinson’s like walking, movement and tremors. These medications work by increasing the level of dopamine in the brain. Symptoms usually are fairly well controlled under the right medication regimen. Nutrition, exercise and other lifestyle modifications can also help control symptoms. Some doctors recommend physical therapy, speech therapy and/or occupational therapy in addition to medication and lifestyle changes.

Parkinson’s disease is unique in the way it affects the body, so no one treatment plan works for each person. In-home health care is a means to obtain a customized care plan for someone battling Parkinson’s disease. In-home care includes therapies, medication management, assistance with activities of daily living and other services to make living with Parkinson’s at home more comfortable and manageable.

Health aides, nursing staff and therapists offer a variety of in-home services to individuals with Parkinson’s:

  • Home safety modifications
  • Personal hygiene, grooming, dressing
  • Light housekeeping and meal preparation
  • Transportation and running errands
  • Medication management
  • Physical, occupational and speech therapy
  • Cognitive stimulation and exercises
  • Support and companionship

AT Home Care understands that, at times, caring for a loved one with Parkinson’s can be challenging and tiring for family members. A health aide can provide an essential in-home medical connection that brings the entire family support system together. Home health aides work with the patient and their caregivers to help reduce some of the duty and responsibility so family and friends can continue to be a strong and present companion in the patient’s life.